Skyline of Richmond, Virginia

UPS pilots unions affiliates with the ITF federation

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton Edition of The Union News

UPS pilots unions affiliates with the ITF federation

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSSWB@AOL.COM

REGION, July 29th- The Independent Pilots Association (IPA) Union, a United States labor organization which represents more than 2600 United Parcel Service (UPS) airline pilots, gained membership in the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF). The ITF is a global alliance of unions representing transportation workers.

“This is an important development in IPA’s history. ITF membership gives us instant access to unions representing UPS workers around the globe. The IPA’s acceptance into the organization is well timed given our ongoing contract negotiations with UPS,” stated Robert Travis, President of the Independent Pilots Association.

Founded in 1896, the ITF is an alliance of more than 700 transportation trade unions spread over 150 countries, representing more than 4.5 million workers. In addition to having a rebust Aviation division, the ITF has focused resources in developing a department related to research and analysis of supply chain and logistics companies such as UPS, FedEx, DHL, TNT, and DPD/GeoPost.

The IFF also is an accredited organization holding representational status with international bodies such as the International Civil Aviation Organization and the International Labor Organization.

“ITF membership will provide us with formal ties to these important international bodies that directly impact our careers.

There is no way to overstate the value of this new relationship. With the resources of the ITF, we will have access to every major union contract covering UPS employees and UPS vendors worldwide as well as direct access to their leadership. This information flow and these personal connections can and will strengthen the IPA’s ability to represent the interests of our members,” added Mr. Travis.

The ITF has 21 affiliated United States member unions.

USW files complaint filed against Cascade Tissue Group

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton Edition of The Union News

USW files complaint filed against Cascade Tissue Group

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSSWB@AOL.COM

REGION, July 30th- The union that represents workers employed at the Cascade Tissue Group, Sathers Drive in Pittston, facility filed a lengthy labor complaint with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Region Four office in Philadelphia alleging the paper mill and paper converting company violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRAct).

The United Steelworkers (USW) Union, Third Street in Berwick, filed the Unfair Labor Practice (ULP) charge against Cascade Tissue Group on July 10th, 2013.

The ULP was discovered by the newspaper while reviewing representation petitions and labor complaints filed at the NLRB. The Union News is the only member of the local media that reviews and publishes news articles regarding their findings.

According to the ULP the number of workers employed at the Cascade Tissue facility in Pittston Township is 220.

The complaint was filed on behalf of USW Local 1448, which represents the Steelworkers members at the facility, by Liz Bettinger, USW District 10 in Berwick Staff Representative.

“On or about June 2013 the Company has made unilateral changes in the terms and conditions of employment for bargaining unit members who are out on sick leave and want to return to work.

The Union demanded to bargain over these changes.

In addition, the Union also requested information regarding individual bargaining unit members who have taken sick leave in the last 5 years and returned to work.

The Company has failed to provide the information requested,” states the ULP.

According to the letter Ms. Bettinger sent to Paul Argenio, Human Resources Manager of Pennsylvania Operations of the Cascade Tissue Group, which was attached to the ULP, the Union alleges “the Company has made a unilateral change in the terms and conditions of employment for bargaining unit members who are out on sick leave and want to return to work. The Union demands (1) bargaining and (2) restoration of the status quo ante pending bargaining,” states the ULP.

The USW also requested information regarding the individuals who were sent to a Physican before returning to work.

Business leaders support raising federal minimum wage

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton Edition of The Union News

Business leaders support raising federal minimum wage

BY PAUL LEESON
THEUNIONNEWSSWB@AOL.COM

REGION, July 25th- Not all business people are against the federal government raising the minimum wage and they recognize that if American workers and their families are to have the buying power neccessary to make the economy strong, the wage must be increased.

Business owners have urged a minimum wage increase to strengthen the economy as on July 24th, marked the fourth year since the last increase in the federal minimum wage.

“I want my employees concerntrating on our customers, not worrying how they will afford to pay rent or put food on their own table. We’ve paid our employees more than the minimum wage from the day we opened, and that’s helped our business succeed. we have low turnover, which saves us money and improves productivity and quality. If my small restaurant can pay higher entry wages, certainly the big chains can too,” said Amanda Rothschild, Co-Owner and Manager of Charmington’s cafe in Baltimore, Maryland, who spoke at the Capitol Hill Press Conference regarding the raising of the wage.

The current federal minimum wage is $7.25 and is lower than it was in 1956 at $8.58 when adjusted for inflation.

Today’s minimum wage workers have far less buying power than their counterparts did in 1968 when the minimum wage was at its highest value of $10.74 in 2013 dollars when adjusted for inflation.

“Employers who pretend they can’t pay a minimum wage equivalent to what their counterparts paid in the 1960s should be ashamed of themselves. Fair wages are part of the formula for success at my company, the worlds leading manufacturer of ultraviolet equipment and fluorescent materials. Raising the minimum wage will help America succeed,” said Jon Copper, the Owner of Spectronics Corporation in New York, who also appeared at the Washington, DC press conference.

The Business for a Fair Minimum Wage, a national network of business owners and executives who believe a fair minimum wage makes good business sense, are lobbying legislators and other business owners to request that the federal minimum wage be increased.

The group want the current $7.25 an hour minimum wage increased to $10.10 in three annual steps of 95 cents each and then provide annual adjustments for inflation.

Walter Klepaski retires from Wyoming Valley United Way

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton Edition of The Union News

Walter Klepaski retires from Wyoming Valley United Way

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSSWB@AOL.COM

REGION, August 4th- Walter Klepaski, the American Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) labor federation United Way of the Wyoming Valley Community Services Labor Liason, the go-between the labor community and the United Way, has retired after more than 33 years on the job.

Mr. Klepaski, 66 years old, last day at the United Way was August 2nd. He started as the Labor Liaison in 1979 and is a member of the Laborers International Union of North America (LIUNA) Local 130 in Scranton.

Mr. Klepaski replaced Rose Brader in 1979 when she retired after serving 31 years as the Labor Liaison of the 29 agency affiliated United Way of the Wyoming Valley. The community based organization was created in 1921 and serves in helping people in need throughout Luzerne County excluding the Hazleton area which has their own United Way chapter. The United Way of the Wyoming Valley has had a Labor Liaison since 1948.

“I plan to do some travelling in my retirement. I’m going to join the American Red Cross Disaster Program as a volunteer,” Mr. Klepaski told the newspaper. He also wants to spend more time with his wife Grace and his eight grandchildren.

Prior to becoming the Labor Liaison Mr. Klepaski was a working member of the Laborers Union Local 215 in Wilkes-Barre. Local 215 is now part of Local 130 in Scranton.

Ms. Brader was a member of the United Textile Workers (UTW) Union.

Mr. Klepaski stated the late legendary labor leader Sam Bianco and Gil Cooney were his mentors after taking the position of labor liaison. “I was blessed over the years to be surrounded by great labor people, which made my job a lot easier,” Mr. Klepaski stated.

Many in labor community believe Tom Corbett most anti-union Governor ever

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, LEHIGH VALLEY Edition of The Union News

Many in labor community believe Tom Corbett most anti-union Governor ever

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSABE@AOL.COM

REGION, July 15th- Many in the labor community throughout Pennsylvania believe Republican Tom Corbett is the most anti-union Governor in the state’s history.

The labor community has put a high priority on defeating Mr. Corbett in 2014, if he seeks a second four-term term as Pennsylvania Governor.

Nearly all of his legislative initiatives involve union represented workers being eliminated. The Corbett agenda has hurt all three groups of the labor community, the building and construction trades, the public sector unions, and the industrial trade unions.

He is currently serving the third year of a four-year term in Harrisburg and has supported many anti-union initiatives while being governor.

Mr. Corbett supports the privitization of Pennsylvania State Liquor Stores, which would put more than 5,000 family sustaining jobs at risk, supports charter schools, supports legislation that would make Pennsylvania a right-to-work state, supports the elimination or making changes to the state prevailing wage law, and awarded a contract to let a British company manage the Pennsylvania Lottery System, a nearly totally unionized system, that would have resulted in those jobs put in harms way. Pennsylvania Attorney Kathleen Kane rejected his plan in February and the system remains operated by the state.

Under the 20-year contract that the Corbett Administration awarded to privitize the Pennsylvania Lottery System, Camelot Global Services, a British company, would have been able to fire the workers that are currently employed by the lottery system.

The American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Union represents approximately 170 of the 230 state workers employed by the lottery system.

Mr. Corbett wanted to privitize the lottery system, which had $3.5 billion in sales last year, and is structured to assure funding to support senior citizen programs.

Legislation supported by Mr. Corbett was voted out of committee by the Pennsylvania House Labor and Industry Committee in April that would effect labor organizations affiliated with the building and construction trades.

Mr. Corbett supports legislation that would prohibit the use of Project Labor Agreements (PLA’s) on public funded projects in Pennsylvania.

Legislation has been introduced several times since Mr. Corbett has been governor that would prohibit the use of PLA’s by public bodies for construction of schools, prisons, roads, and other public buildings in Pennsylvania.

A PLA is a comprehensive agreement signed by a builder and local craft unions under which a defined construction project is agreed to be completed by workers from the local union halls, in return for the union’s guarantee of no strikes, a steady labor supply, and general labor peace.

Frank Sirianni, President of the Pennsylvania Building and Construction Trades Council in Harrisburg, which is a labor federation representing unions who members are employed within the construction industry, believes corporate greed is behind any anti-PLA legislation and Mr. Corbett supports such greed.

Mr. Corbett also stated he would sign legislation that would ban union security clauses in labor agreements which is also called “right-to-work” or “no-rights-at-work” laws.

Michigan became the twenty-fourth state in the nation to pass right-to-work legislation that bans the signing of union security clauses. Indiana passed the law in 2011 and the last state before them to pass the law was Oklahoma in 2001.

However, Mr. Corbett indicated in January that he believes while he would support the banning of union security and would sign the legislation should it reach his desk, more issues are more pressing in Pennsylvania than pushing the right-to-work law.

Sheet Metal Workers Union files additional ULP complaint

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, LEHIGH VALLEY Edition of The Union News

Sheet Metal Workers Union files additional ULP complaint

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSABE@AOL.COM

REGION, July 13th- The Sheet Metal Workers International Association (SMWIA) Union Local 19 in Philadelphia, which represents SMWIA members throughout the Lehigh Valley, continues to file additional labor complaints with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Region Four office in Philadelphia alleging a Lehigh Valley construction company violated multible sections of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRAct).

In previous news articles published exclusively in this newspaper, it was reported that Local 19 has filed multible Unfair Labor Practices (ULP’s) against M.B.I. HVAC Inc., 450 Business Park Lane in Allentown, with the NLRB alleging the HVAC construction and service work company violated the NLRAct leading-up to the NLRB conducted representation election involving their employees.

The agency conducted a representation election of employees of M.B.I. HVAC Inc. on November 16th, 2012.

There were 8 eligible to vote employees and 3 voted for union representation of Local 19 while 3 voted against union representation for the purpose of collective bargaining. Under NLRB rules a labor organization must receive at least percent plus one of the eligible voting employees to become their bargaining representative.

Local 19 challenged two of the workers eligibity to participate in the election and since filed multible ULP charges since the election was conducted alleging the Employer violated the NLRAct.

Local 19 filed a ULP against the construction contractor alleging the Employer interred with conditions necessary to conduct a fair election. The company the night before the election, without explanation or notice to employees, disabled the use of company issued cellular phones to inhibit communication among the unit of employees. Also, a ULP alleged a company representative threatened a known union supporter in advance of a NLRB hearing regarding previous filed labor complaints.

The latest complaint was filed on July 1st, 2013 by William Dorward, Local 19 Area Marketing Representative. The ULP alleges the Employer had concealed the fact that it had given a bargaining unit employee a secret loan in exchange for his vote in the election that was later reversed by the NLRB.

ATU Local 1603 alleges bus operator violated NLRAct

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, LEHIGH VALLEY Edition of The Union News

ATU Local 1603 alleges bus operator violated NLRAct

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSABE@AOL.COM

REGION, July 15th- The Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 1603, P.O. Box 2034, Lehigh Valley, filed several labor complaints with the The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Region Four office in Philadelphia alleging a local bus operator violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRAct).

The ATU filed the Unfair Labor Practice’s (ULP’s) against Brandywine-Lehigh Transportation LLC, State Street in Mertztown, Pennsylvania, which operates a bus facility in Center Valley and provides transportation services for the Southern Lehigh School District.

The newspaper discovered the ULP’s while reviewing ULP’s and Representation Petitions filed at the NLRB Region Four office.

According to a complaint filed on May 31st, 2013, Local 1603 alleges since on or about May 28th, 2013 the company refuses to bargain in good faith by conducting a secret ballot poll of bargaining unit employees to determine their support for the Union. ATU Local 1603 is the recognized bargaining representative for bus drivers and other related employees at the Employer’s facility in Center Valley.

The ULP alleges the Employer’s allegation of good faith reasonable doubt as to the Union’s majority staus is unsupported, the complaint states.

The ULP’s were filed on behalf of the Local 1603 by Allentown Attorney Quintes Taglioli.

The ULP’s state the number of workers employed by Brandywine-Lehigh Transportation at the Center Valley facility is 100.

The second complaint was filed on June 19th, 2013 and alleges the Employer terminated Jadell Rehrig because of her membership and activities on behalf of ATU Local 1603 and at all times since has refused to hire her.

According to the ULP, the Union had a Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) with First Student Inc., which provided bus service for the Southern Lehigh School District. In August 2012 Brandywine-Lehigh Transportation commenced bus service operations for the Southern Lehigh School District replacing First Student Inc.

The Employer hired the majority of employees of First Student Inc. and Ms. Rehrig was one of the employees. CBA negotiations commenced between the two parties and Ms. Rehrig attended one of the meetings and thereafter she was terminated, the ULP alleges.

Lehigh Valley’s unemployment rate decreases to 7.9 percent

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, LEHIGH VALLEY Edition of The Union News

ATU Local 1603 alleges bus operator violated NLRAct

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSABE@AOL.COM
REGION, July 15th- The Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 1603, P.O.
Box 2034, Lehigh Valley, filed several labor complaints with the The
National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Region Four office in Philadelphia alleging
a local bus operator violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRAct).
The ATU filed the Unfair Labor Practice’s (ULP’s) against
Brandywine-Lehigh Transportation LLC, State Street in Mertztown, Pennsylvania, which
operates a bus facility in Center Valley and provides transportation services
for the Southern Lehigh School District.
The newspaper discovered the ULP’s while reviewing ULP’s and
Representation Petitions filed at the NLRB Region Four office.
According to a complaint filed on May 31st, 2013, Local 1603 alleges
since on or about May 28th, 2013 the company refuses to bargain in good faith
by conducting a secret ballot poll of bargaining unit employees to determine
their support for the Union. ATU Local 1603 is the recognized bargaining r
epresentative for bus drivers and other related employees at the Employer’s
facility in Center Valley.
The ULP alleges the Employer’s allegation of good faith reasonable doubt
as to the Union’s majority staus is unsupported, the complaint states.
The ULP’s were filed on behalf of the Local 1603 by Allentown Attorney
Quintes Taglioli.
The ULP’s state the number of workers employed by Brandywine-Lehigh
Transportation at the Center Valley facility is 100.
The second complaint was filed on June 19th, 2013 and alleges the
Employer terminated Jadell Rehrig because of her membership and activities on
behalf of ATU Local 1603 and at all times since has refused to hire her.
According to the ULP, the Union had a Collective Bargaining Agreement
(CBA) with First Student Inc., which provided bus service for the Southern
Lehigh School District. In August 2012 Brandywine-Lehigh Transportation
commenced bus service operations for the Southern Lehigh School District replacing
First Student Inc.
The Employer hired the majority of employees of First Student Inc. and
Ms. Rehrig was one of the employees. CBA negotiations commenced between the
two parties and Ms. Rehrig attended one of the meetings and thereafter she
was terminated, the ULP alleges.

AUGUST 2013, LEHIGH VALLEY Edition of The Union News

Lehigh Valley’s unemployment rate decreases to 7.9 percent

BY PAUL LEESON
THEUNIONNEWSABE@AOL.COM

REGION, July 12th- According to labor data provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, Center for Workforce Information and Analysis in Harrisburg, the Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), seasonally adjusted unemployment rate is 7.9 percent, decreasing by two-tenths of a percentage point from the previous report, which was released approximately four week before. The Metropolitan Statistical Area includes Lehigh, Northampton, and Carbon Counties of Pennsylvania and Warren County, New Jersey. Twelve months ago the unemployment rate for the region was at 8.5 percent.

There are fourteen Metropolitan Statistical Area’s in Pennsylvania and the Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton MSA is tied with the Williamsport MSA for the fourth highest unemployment rate.

The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton MSA has the highest unemployment rate in Pennsylvania at 9.3 percent. The Johnstown MSA has the second highest unemployment rate at 8.9 percent while the the Philadelphia MSA is third at 8.1 percent.

The State College MSA has the lowest unemployment rate in Pennsylvania at 5.7 percent. The Lebanon MSA and the Lancaster MSA are tied for the second lowest rate at 6.2 percent while the Harrisburg MSA is third at 6.8 percent. The Altoona MSA has the fourth lowest unemployment rate 6.9 percent.

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Pennsylvania is 7.5 percent, dropping by one-tenth of a percentage point from the previous report and decreasing by four-tenths of a percentage point from twelve months before.

There are 488,000 Pennsylvania residents without jobs, but that number does not include residents that have exhausted their unemployment benefits and stopped looking for work.

Pennsylvania has a seasonally adjusted workforce of 6,521,000 and 6,033,000 of them have employment.

The national seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was reported to be 7.6 percent, increasing by one-tenth from the previous report. The national unemployment rate was down six-tenths of a percentage point from twelve months before.

The Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton MSA has the third largest labor force in Pennsylvania with 438,400 civilians and 34,800 have no employment. The Philadelphia MSA has the largest seasonally adjusted labor force at 3,023,200 with 245,400 not working; and the Pittsburgh MSA has the second largest labor force at 1,262,300 with 87,100 without jobs.

Northampton County has the lowest unemployment rate in the MSA at 7.7 percent, dropping by two-tenths of a percentage point from the previous report. Carbon County has the highest unemployment rate in the MSA at 9.3 percent, decreasing by three-tenths of a percentage point from the month before. The unemployment rate in Lehigh County is 7.9 percent, dropping by one-tenth of a percentage point form the previous report.

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton MSA’s unemployment rate remains highest at 9.2 percent

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton Edition of The Union News

MSA’s unemployment rate remains highest at 9.2 percent

BY PAUL LEESON
THEUNIONNEWSSWB@AOL.COM

REGION, July 31st- According to labor data provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, the region’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate is 9.2 percent, decreasing by one-tenth of a percentage point from the previous report, which was released approximately four weeks before. The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) includes Lackawanna, Luzerne and Wyoming Counties of Pennsylvania. Twelve months ago the unemployment rate for the region was 9.5 percent.

The unemployment rate in Pennsylvania is 7.5 percent, unchanged from the previous report. Pennsylvania has a seasonally adjusted civilian labor force of 6,529,000 with 490,000 not working and 6,040,000 with employment. Pennsylvania’s unemployment rate decreased by five-tenths of a percentage points over the past year.

The national unemployment rate is 7.6 percent, also unchanged from the previous report. The national unemployment rate fell by six-tenths of a percentage point from twelve months ago. The unemployment rate does not include civilians that unemployment benefits have expired and stopped looking for work.

There are 11,777,000 civilians in the nation reported to be unemployed. That number also does not include civilians that have exhausted their unemployment benefits and have stopped looking for work.

The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre MSA continues to have the highest unemployment rate among the 14 MSA’s within Pennsylvania.

The Johnstown MSA has the second highest unemployment rate in the commonwealth at 8.8 percent, the Philadelphia MSA has the third highest at 8.1 percent with the Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton MSA and the Williamsport MSA tied for fourth at 7.8 percent.

The State College MSA has the lowest unemployment rate in Pennsylvania at 5.8 percent. The Lebanon MSA has the second lowest unemployment rate at 6.2 percent while the Lancaster MSA has the third lowest unemployment rate in Pennsylvania at 6.3 percent. The Harrisburg MSA has the fourth lowest unemployment rate at 6.7 percent, followed by the Altoona MSA at 6.8 percent.

The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre MSA has the fifth largest labor force in Pennsylvania with 285,700 civilians and 26,200 of them are without employment. The Philadelphia MSA has the largest labor-force in Pennsylvania at 3,031,800 with 244,100 not working; the Pittsburgh MSA has the second largest labor-force at 1,266,600 with 86,300 without jobs; and the Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton MSA has the third largest labor force at 441,700 with 34,700 not working. The Harrisburg MSA has the fourth largest labor force in Pennsylvania with 289,000 civilians with 19,400 not working.

The Williamsport MSA has the smallest labor force in Pennsylvania with 64,200 civilians and 5,000 of them have no jobs. The Altoona MSA has the second smallest labor-force with 64,800 civilians with 4,400 without employment and the Johnstown MSA is third with a labor-force of 68,600 and 6,000 of them are not working.

Luzerne County has the highest unemployment rate within the MSA at 9.5 percent, increasing by one-tenth of a percentage point from the previous report but dropping by six-tenths of a percentage point from twleve months before. Luzerne County has a civilian labor force of 163,200 with 15,500 of them not employed.

Lackawanna County has the lowest unemployment rate within the MSA at 9.0 percent, rising by one-tenth of a percentage point from the previous report and one year ago. Lackawanna County has a civilian labor force of 108,900, and 9,800 civilians are jobless.

Wyoming County unemployment rate is 9.4 percent, increasing by six-tenths of a percentage point from the previous report and unchanged from twelve months before. Wyoming County has a civilian labor-force of 14,600, with 1,400 unemployed.

SEIU files another complaint against Keystone Job Center

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton Edition of The Union News

SEIU files another complaint against Keystone Job Center

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSSWB@AOL.COM

REGION, July 29th- The Service Employees International Union (SEIU), the Pennsylvania Social Services Union (PSSU) Local 668, Main Street in Dickson City in Lackawanna County, filed a labor complaint with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Region Four office in Philadelphia alleging Keystone Job Corp Center, violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRAct). Keystone provides job training for disabled individuals between 16 and 24 year olds.

The SEIU represents three separate bargaining units of Keystone Job Corps Center including one comprising of maintenance, dietary and transportation employees, one comprised of residential advisor employees and one comprised of instructors, counselors, nurses and other employees.

The Unfair Labor Practice (ULP) was filed by Local 668 Business Representative Kim Yost, who has filed other labor complaints against Keystone Job Corp management during the past six months, and was discovered by the newspaper while reviewing ULP’s at the NLRB.

SEIU Local 668 has approximately 130 members employed by Keystone Job Corporation, which is operated by Management and Training Corporation of Centerville, Utah. Keystone has approximately 167 employees including nonbargaining unit employees.

The ULP alleges the Employer has interfered with, restrained, and coerced its employees by its counsel, Martha Amundsen, who threatened employees that bargaining would be changing because of the Union’s prior unfair labor practice charges.

Also, the ULP alleges the Employer has failed to bargain collectively and in good faith with SEIU Local 668, consistent with its threat by changing bargaining proposals.

Marley’s Mission opens new facility with help of union tradespeople

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton Edition of The Union News

Marley’s Mission opens new facility with help of union tradespeople

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSSWB@AOL.COM

REGION, August 2nd- Much of the recently opened Marley’s Mission near Ranson Township in Lackawanna County, just a few miles from the Clarks-Summit State Hospital, was constructed by volunteer tradespeople of the building and construction trades including members of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Union Local 81 in Scranton.

Marley’s Mission was created after a 5 year old girl was brutally attacked in her own room by a complete stranger. Police captured the girl’s attacker and was prosecuted and is serving a life sentence.

A outpouring of support from the community was overwhelming and a fund was established for the benefit of the little girl. With these funds the family moved from their home to try to start a new life and they bought the little girl a horse.

After limited success with traditional therapy, a horse was infused into her therapy regimen and immediately a recognizable change was witnessed. For the first time since the attack, the mother of the little girl saw a glimmer of her daughter that had not been seen since July 2009, when the brutal attack occurred.

It was at this time that April Loposky realized that if a horse can have such a dramatic and positive impact on the healing process of her daughter, why couldn’t it help other childhood victims of abuse. Marley’s Mission was then created to help those victims.

First located in Lake Ariel, Marley’s Mission is a non-profit organization that provides equine-based therapy free of charge to children, and their familes, who have experienced trauma. Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP) has shown evidenced-based efficacy in patients who have experience abuse and now suffer with depression, anxiety and other symptoms as a result of abuse.

Marley’s Mission has horses, the use of stables and fields at the Lake Ariel location and recently opened their new site in Lackawanna County with the volunteer help of several local building and construction trade unions.

According to Rick Schraeder, Business Manager of Local 81, his members voluntarily worked more than 2,000 man hours at Marley’s Mission Ranson site including working after normal work hours, Saturdays and Sunday’s, and even on the July 4th Holiday.

The 74 IBEW Apprentices and 50 Journeymen installed 3,000 feet of conduit, 2,500 feet of wire, 12,000 feet of MC cable and placed all of the connections, couplings, straps, fasteners, and tape needed to make the electricity work throughout the facility.

Gino Arcurie Jr., Local 81 Treasurer, told the newspaper Journeyman members Mike Brust, Clint Muir, and Adam Horsky oversaw the work. Mr. Arcurie stated his members also rescured a horse that got stuck in the mud.

IBEW Local 81 has around 500 active members which includes employees of the Scranton Housing Authority.

Nursing home operator fails to respond to bargaining request

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton Edition of The Union News

Nursing home operator fails to respond to bargaining request

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSSWB@AOL.COM

REGION, July 30th- The union that was successful in winning a representation election conducted by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Region Four office in Philadelphia at a regional nursing home, has not been able to get a meeting with management representatives to begin bargaining for a first-time labor contract.

In the previous edition of the newspaper, it was “exclusively” reported that despite the spending of tens of thousands of dollars on anti-union attorney’s and employment consulting firms, the operators of a local nursing home were unsuccessful in convincing their employees from voting for the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Union District Council 87 as their representative for the purpose of collective bargaining.

In previous articles published in the newspaper it was reported that AFSCME Council 87 in Dunmore filed a representation petition with the NLRB on March 18th, 2013 requesting the agency conduct a election to determine if full-time and regular part-time Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN’s) and other professional employees of the Manor and Pavilion at St. Luke’s Village Nursing Home on Stacie Drive in Hazleton want to be represented by the union. District Council 87 represents other St. Luke’s employees including aids and food service workers.

The operators of the Hazleton nursing home hired a lawfirm to represented them that specializes in attempting to delay representation elections.

The petition was filed by Robin Calabria, a union organizer for AFSCME Council 13 in Harrisburg, which District Council 87 is affiliated.

It was reported that AFSCME withdrew the petition on April 1st, 2013 but refiled it on the same day. However, the employer challenged the right of whether the LPN’s had the right to become union members claiming they are supervisors and under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRAct) are ineligible from joining unions.

The NLRB ruled in favor of AFSCME and scheduled a election for June 13th, 2013. The fourty-three workers eligible to participate in the election voted in the NLRB conducted election to be represented by AFSCME, 26 to 12.

According to Matt Balas, Business Representative for District Council 87, management has not responded to certified letters requesting meetings be scheduled between the parties to gain a first-time labor agreement. Mr. Balas stated labor charges may be filed if management continues to ignore correspondence from AFSCME.

Mohegan Sun project delayed because of poor workmanship

08.28.13

AUGUST 2013, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton Edition of The Union News

Mohegan Sun project delayed because of poor workmanship

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSSWB@AOL.COM

REGION, August 3rd- Mike Bean, the President and General Manager at the Mohegan Sun Casino at Pocono Downs in Luzerne County, recently announed the $50 million hotel and convention center under construction and that was slated to open in early fall will be delayed until late fall because of construction issues.

The newspaper has learned part of the delay is because of poor workmanship of out-of-the-area nonunion construction workers that were hired by Mohegan Sun while many local unionized tradespeople are finding it difficult to keep employed.

The percentage of work on the more than 20,000 square foot convention center and the 238 guest room hotel being done by nonunion often out-of-the-area construction workers was estimated to be more than 60 percent by Mike Rozitski, the President of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Building and Construction Trades Council labor federation. Mr. Rozitski stated nearly every construction union affiliated with the labor federation has not been hired for some of the project’s construction.

In 2005, when the main casino building was built, a Project Labor Agreement (PLA) was signed between the Northeastern Building and Construction Trades Council and Mohegan Sun operators. However, Mohegan Sun would not sign a PLA for these projects, Mr. Rozitski said. A PLA is a comprehensive agreement signed by a builder and local craft unions under which a defined construction project is agreed to be completed by workers from local union halls, in return for a guarantee of labor peace and a steady labor supply.

In the past, members of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Union Local 163 in Wilkes-Barre, picketed outside of the Mohegan Sun protesting the hiring of a Missouri-based contractor for the electrical work. Also, other unions have held similar events protesting their members not being hired for parts of the projects.

Members of the International Brotherhood of Carpenters Union Local 645 held a banner in front of the project stating Mohegan Sun officials should be ashamed of themselves for not hiring local construction workers to perform work that would be usually done by Local 645 members.

John Gatto, Assistant Business Manager of the Painters and Allied Trades International Union (PATIU) District Council 21, Drums, stated he currently has members working along-side with members of Local 645 replacing building materials that was constructed and was full of mold because of poor craftmanship. “They needed as many people that we can give them because the drywall was hung without being protected from the whether. It had to be torn-out and replaced because of mold,” stated Mr. Gatto.

Meanwhile, even after leaning of the poor craftesmanship of the nonunion out-of-the-area workers, Mohegan Sun officials continue to hire nonunion contractors for work of the projects.