Skyline of Richmond, Virginia

Pennsylvania workers losing employer based healthcare

11.18.09

December 2009, Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton edition of The Union News

Pennsylvania workers losing employer based healthcare

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSABE@AOL.COM

REGION, November 4th- According to a newly released report analyzing United States Census data, employers provided health insurance to 694,471 fewer Pennsylvanians in 2007 and 2008 than at the start of the decade.

The Economic Policy Institute (EPI) in Washington, DC and the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center in Harrisburg jointly released the study which found that Pennsylvania outstripped every state in the nation except Michigan in the loss of employer sponsored health care between 2000-2001 and 2007-2008.

Nationally, the percentage of Americans under age 65 covered by an employer policy fell in each of the past eight years, going from 68.3 percent in 2000 to 61.9 percent in 2008. That amounts to 17 million fewer Americans insured by an employer policy today.

“The strong ink between jobs and health care is eroding. Pennsylvanians who once relied on a job to bring family health coverage increasingly must look for other options,” said Sharon Ward, Director of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center. “Congress must act soon to reform the health care system to make health care more affordable to employers and to families.”

The number of Pennsylvania workers and their dependents with employment-based health insurance fell from 7,929,984 in 2000-2001 to 7,235,512 in 2007-2008, a decline of 694,471. The rate of employer coverage in the commonwealth dropped from 75.9 percent in 2000-2001 to 69.7 percent in 2007-2008, outstripping the national average decline during that period.

Overall, Pennsylvania has a higher rate of employment based coverage than the national average. Among the 50 states and Washington, DC the state ranked 10th in employer coverage rates in 2007-2008.

Still, the rate and number of children without health insurance has bucked overall downward trends in Pennsylvania, remaining the same between 2000-2001 and 2007-2008. For both periods, approximately 200,000 children lacked coverage, making up slightly more than 7 percent of the population.

As is the case nationally, increased enrollment in Medicaid and SCHIP compensated for the loss of employment-based coverage for kids. Since 2000-2001, the share of the population with coverage through those public programs grew from 10 percent to 14.3 percent in Pennsylvania.

The study shows a major cause of the decline in employer coverage is the skyrocketing cost of health care, which has made employers less likely to offer insurance coverage to their workers. Given the state of the economy, millions more Americans are expected to lose employer-sponsored health insurance over the next two years which is likely to future strain public programs.

SEIU members concerned Allentown State Hospital may be closed

11.18.09

December 2009, Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton edition of The Union News

SEIU members concerned Allentown State Hospital may be closed

BY PAUL TUCKER
THEUNIONNEWSABE@AOL.COM

REGION, November 9th- On November 2nd the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Pennsylvania Social Services Union (PSSU) Local 668 held a rally at the Allentown State Hospital on Hanover Avenue in Allentown to protest the possible closing of the psychiatric hospital.

Mike Baker, Local 668, Chapter 13 Chairman stated the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare (DPW) in Harrisburg has indicated the 97 year old hospital might to closed and the residents would be moved to other state facilities including in Lackawanna County and Berks County.

“We were pleased that many of the public officials that were invited attended the rally. The purpose of the rally was to bring attention to the possibility of DPW closing the much needed hospital,” said Mr. Baker.

Pennsylvania has closed twelve of its psychiatric hospitals since 1979, bringing the number of state owned facilities including Allentown to seven.

Democratic Pennsylvania Governor Edward Rendell recently supported the selling of the state owned and operated Scranton School for Deaf in Scranton. Mr. Rendell since being Governor has made it known he favors privitizing many of the state owned assets including the Pennsylvania turnpike, the state liquor stores, and psychiatric hospitals.

Mr. Baker stated currently there are approximately 180 patients at the facility and SEIU Local 668 represents around 26 of the 400 hospital workers. The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Union and the SEIU, Pennsylvania Healthcare Union also represent workers at the facility.

There was more than nine elected public officials that attended the rally to show support for the employees and the patients that would need to be moved out-side the Lehigh Valley should the hospital be closed.

“I was there not only to show support for the employees, but also to support the Lehigh Valley economy,” said Democratic Pennsylvania House of Representative Joseph Brennan (133rd Legislative District).

Mr. Brennan, who was elected to the state assembly in 2006, told the newspaper the loss of the good-paying jobs at the hospital would hurt the Lehigh Valley economy. “There isn’t any other state owned facilities the employees could get a job at. Those workers would be out of a job if the hospital closes,” said Mr. Brennan.

In the past when state jobs were eliminated because of a similar situation, the workers were offered other jobs. Mr. Brennan stated, in 2006 a State Hospital was closed in Harrisburg and the workers were offered other employment but there is no other state owned facility for the workers to get jobs now. “If there is anything that I can do, not only for the employees and patients but also for the economy of the Lehigh Valley, I will do.”

Representative Brennan believes the decision to close the facility would not likely be made before Mr. Rendell leaves office in Janaury 2011. “I’m pretty confident nothing will happen in the near future,” said Mr. Brennan.